Relax, Read, Retain

A common misconception with speed reading is that to achieve speeds of 2000 words per minute plus, you must move your guide (finger, chopstick, pencil, etc.) frantically across the page. Let’s think about this for a moment. The average line of a book contains 12 to 14 words. 2000 words per minute equates to roughly 150 lines. That’s 0.4 seconds per line. This seems you…

Are some texts easier to learn than with than others?

Just as with conventional reading, some texts are more complex, technical or simply badly written. Obviously these present more of a challenge. However, one of the benefits of speed reading is the fact that comprehension improves with increased speed. This may sound counterintuitive. Many people believe that speed and comprehension are inversely proportional so as you get faster your comprehension drops. This is a fallacy.…

Is Speed Reading Useful When Marking Papers?

If you are teacher or lecturer then a large amount of your time is probably taken up by marking essays from your students. Appropriate use of Speed Reading and Information management techniques can reduce the amount of time you need to spend on this. You need to establish the objective of the essay. If this is to test understanding of an aspect of a subject…

Is comprehension better when you Speed Read?

It is a common fallacy that speed reading is a trade-off between speed and comprehension. It seems logical that as you get faster, you take in less and so comprehension suffers. When I was at primary school we had reading cards. The instructions were, “read this slowly and carefully and then answer questions on the other side.” In actual fact, speed and comprehension can both…